2016: The year of the lizard in a lab coat (1)



2016 was a huge year for Repositive! We raised £500K seed funding in January, we officially launched in September, and after indexing over 35 sources became the largest portal for human genomic data in October!

One of the most iconic introductions to the Repositive world in 2016, was our blog. As we wind down for Christmas I have taken the opportunity to look back at 2016 and some of the biggest blog posts for the year!


PART ONE: January - June


February 17th 2016: Repositive Announced as Winners of Pistoia Alliance President’s Start Up Challenge

It is hard to believe, but this time last year I was creating storyboards and scripts for a 5 minute Repositive video. Its purpose? To support our application to the Pistoia Alliance Start Up Challenge. All the hard work on the video and application paid off; we won first prize and were announced as winners in February (view the video here). On top of a cash prize we received six months of expert one-to-one mentorship from senior industry figures and this certainly helped towards our brand awareness, user growth and market positioning in 2016.


March 15th 2016: How to successfully apply for access to dbGaP

It's clear that accessing dbGaP is a massive headache for many genomic researchers and bioinformaticians, and was perfectly described in Matthew Youngs 'Accessing dbGaP, a bureaucratic odyssey" two blog post series. The series received much acclaim for perfectly (and with plenty of dry humour) summarising the difficulties accessing dbGaP. However, Matthew took this negative experience and turned it into something positive and created a guide on how to successfully apply for access. In doing so, Matthew has valiantly saved others falling into the otherwise inevitable pitfalls and black holes.


April 4th 2016: The Human Genome Project becomes a teenager

The HGP was set up in 1990 with the basic aim to elucidate the sequence of all 3 billion bases within the human genome, known as DNA sequencing. The overarching goals of the HGP were to provide researchers with tools to understand the genetic factors involved with human disease, which in turn would pave the way for new strategies for disease diagnosis, treatment and prevention. The HGP had an estimated delivery date of 15 years, but in the end was actually delivered in only 13 years. Our Product Manager Charlotte explores the concrete outcomes from HGP 13 years later, in this hugely popular blog post.


May 6th 2016: An Introduction to TypeScript

If you read our main website (without visiting our blog) it is easy to forget our somewhat secret following of web developers. Thanks to an awesome and selfie taking dev team, 2016 brought a number of impactful blog posts onto the world wide web. None more so than "An Introduction into Typescript" by Junior Web Developer Daniel Gynn. Daniel draws quite a crowd, and has even had reblogs by Ember.js! It's no wonder, because although he sincerely outlines his experiences using the latest tools and techniques, Daniel gives a very comprehensive "how to" guide explaining why and how to use Typescript. All hail Daniel!



That concludes the very best blog posts from the first 6 months of 2016. We hope you enjoyed this recap and be sure to keep an eye out for the second recap coming after Christmas. We all know you'll be back on social media on the 28th December.


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